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Tropical Storm Norma (2005)

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Tropical Storm Norma was the 15th named storm of the 2005 Pacific hurricane season. It formed from a large low-pressure region located southwest of Manzanillo, Colima, Mexico; the disturbance strengthened into a tropical depression on September 22, and reached tropical storm status four hours later. Convection increased as the storm developed some banding features and its reached peak intensity on September 24. Norma became more scattered as eastern wind shear caused it to become disorganized. The storm's intensity continued to reduce on September 25, and weakened to tropical depression level later the next day. The depression dissipated to a remnant low on September 27, continuing to drift northwestward. It traveled weakly in a circle, finally diminishing on October 1.

Norma remained far from land, and there were no reports of death or property damage from the storm.

Meteorological historyEdit

On September 19, 2005, a large tropical disturbance formed south of Manzanillo, Colima.[1] An elongated area of low pressure formed within the slowly-moving disturbance on 21 September, but persistent easterly shear helped keep the disturbance from becoming better organized.[1] On September 21, a number of small vortices rotated within a broader cyclonic envelope. The formation strengthened into Tropical Depression Fourteen-E by 10:00 p.m., located about 402 miles (650 km) southwest of Manzanillo.[2] Four hours later, it then attained tropical storm status and was given the name Norma by the National Hurricane Center.[3] During that time, the storm's convection increased near its center.[3]

On September 24, Norma continued to slowly move in a northwestward direction from 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. PDT.[4] Around mid-day some banding features also developed and the storm's center became more embedded within the convection; it reached a peak intensity of 55 mph (90 km/h).[1] Easterly wind shear caused a decrease in the storm's organization later on September 24, generally weakening the convection. Norma's low level center became almost stationary as it was exposed to the east.[5] The center was then exposed from the convective activity by northwest winds early on September 25, and the storm's intensity was reduced.[6] The sheared system began to gradually weaken as the center was located near the northeastern edge of poorly-organized deep convection.[7] Norma was downgraded to a tropical depression on September 26 at 1800 UTC.[1]

It continued a northwestern track that day, and an increase in convection was seen just west of the storm's low center.[8] There was a possibility of the storm to increase in speed due to warmer waters,[9] but the storm instead slowed towards the end of the day.[8] Deep convection fully diminished by the end of the day, and the storm degenerated into a remnant low on September 27.[10] The remnant low survived for several more days, slowly traveling in a southwestern circle. It fully dissipated on October 1, located about 690 miles (1,115 km) west-southwest of Cabo San Lucas.[1]

ImpactEdit

Norma remained far from land and never threatened to make landfall or impact the Mexican coast. No property damage or casualties were reported, and no ships were impacted. In addition, no tropical cyclone watches and warnings were issued.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 James L. Franklin & Eric S. Blake (2006-01-23). "Tropical Cyclone Report: Tropical Storm Norma". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-EP142005_Norma.pdf. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  2. Stewart (2005-09-22). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 1". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.001.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  3. 3.0 3.1 Stewart (2005-09-23). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 2". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.002.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-11-30. 
  4. Stewart (2005-09-24). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 8". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.008.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  5. Knabb (2008-09-24). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 9". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.009.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  6. Beven (2005-09-25). "Tropical Storm Norma discussion Number 10". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.010.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  7. Pasch (2005-09-25). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 11". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.011.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-01. 
  8. 8.0 8.1 Knabb (2005-09-26). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 17". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.017.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-02. 
  9. Pasch (2005-09-26). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 16". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.016.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-02. 
  10. Franklin (2005-09-27). "Tropical Storm Norma Discussion Number 17". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2005/dis/ep142005.discus.018.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-12-02. 

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