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Tropical Storm Melissa was the thirteenth named storm of the 2007 Atlantic hurricane season. A short-lived storm that remained weak due to high wind shear, Melissa formed southwest of the Cape Verde islands. It tracked north-northwestward, and dissipated without affecting any land areas. Melissa was only notable for being the eighth named storm of September 2007, which tied the record for the month of September.[1]

Meteorological historyEdit

On September 26, a low pressure area emerged off the west coast of Africa. An area of low pressure formed on September 27 near Cape Verde in association with the wave, and convection gradually increased. Early on September 28, a rapid increase in convection and a well-organized outflow pattern allowed the low to develop into Tropical Depression Fourteen about 115 miles (185 km) west-southwest of the southernmost Cape Verde Islands.[2][3] Because the depression was far removed from the subtropical ridge and an upper-level low pressure area was sitting to the north, steering currents were weak at first, and the depression drifted very slowly on a general west-northwest track.[2] Vertical wind shear from the west aided in preventing development.[4] Slight strengthening took place early on September 29 as convection increased in the system, and the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Melissa.[5]

Similar to previous storms Ingrid and Karen, high wind shear in the deep tropics hindered Melissa's development.[6] Operationally, the storm briefly attained winds of 45 mph (75 km/h) late on September 29 as some satellite estimates showed a slightly stronger storm with deeper convection,[7] but in the post-season analysis, Melissa was found to have been weaker, remaining at 40 mph (65 km/h).[2] By early on September 30, wind shear began to dramatically increase and a weakening trend began.[8] That morning, the increased shear combined with cooler sea surface temperatures weakened Melissa to a tropical depression with a poorly-defined surface center, as it continued to move west-northwest at a slightly faster pace.[9] The system lost its deep convection and by the afternoon of September 30, Melissa degenerated into a remnant low as thunderstorm activity diminished.[10] After the circulation dissipated, the remnant low continued its general west-northwest track to the south of a rebuilding subtropical ridge in the central Atlantic.[2] The low produced intermittent convection until it was absorbed by a frontal zone late on October 5 to the northeast of the Leeward Islands.[2]

Impact and recordsEdit

Melissa remained away from land during its lifespan, never threatening any land areas. There were no ship reports of tropical storm-force winds as a result of Melissa. No damage or casualties were reported.[2] When Tropical Depression Fourteen was upgraded to Tropical Storm Melissa on September 29, it was the eighth named storm to form in the month of September. That tied a record for the month of September, which was first set in the 2002 season.[1]

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 Forecasters Mainelli; Avila; Brown; Blake; Rhome; Knabb; Franklin; Pasch (2007-10-01). "Tropical Weather Summary - September 2007". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/tws/MIATWSAT_sep.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 Richard D. Knabb (2007-10-13). "Tropical Cyclone Report for Tropical Storm Melissa". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/pdf/TCR-AL142007_Melissa.pdf. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  3. Avila (2007-09-28). "Tropical Depression Fourteen Discussion #1". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.001.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  4. Beven (2007-09-28). "Tropical Depression Fourteen Discussion #3". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.003.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  5. Knabb (2007-09-29). "Tropical Storm Melissa Discussion #4". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.004.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  6. Knabb (2007-09-29). "Tropical Storm Melissa Discussion #5". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.005.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  7. Knabb (2007-09-29). "Tropical Storm Melissa Discussion #7". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.007.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  8. Knabb (2007-09-30). "Tropical Storm Melissa Discussion #8". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.008.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  9. Knabb (2007-09-30). "Tropical Depression Melissa Discussion #9". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.009.shtml?. Retrieved 2007-11-12. 
  10. Brown (2007). "Tropical Depression Melissa discussion number 10". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2007/al14/al142007.discus.010.shtml?. Retrieved 2008-03-17. 

External linksEdit

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