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Tropical Storm Dolly was the fourth named storm of the 2002 Atlantic hurricane season. Dolly developed out of a tropical wave which moved off the coast of Africa on August 27. The wave quickly became organized and on August 29 wave was declared a tropical depression while located 550 nmi (1,020 km) southwest of the Cape Verde islands. The depression quickly intensified into a tropical storm six hours later as banding features fully developed. Dolly reached its peak intensity of 60 mph (95 km/h) the next morning before interaction with a subtropical ridge caused the storm to weaken slightly early on September 1. Dolly fluctuated in intensity over the next several days before a mid-level trough caused the storm to weaken into a tropical depression on September 4 and further into a remnant low. After Dolly deteriorated into a remnant low, it was absorbed by the mid-level trough.


Meteorological historyEdit

Tropical Storm Dolly formed out of a tropical wave which formed off the African coast on August 27. The wave quickly intensified as it passed to the south of the Cape Verde islands. The wave continued to organize as it was located in a favorable environment for intensification with low wind shear and warm waters. In the late morning hours of August 29, the wave had developed sufficient convection to be designated Tropical Depression Four while located 550 nmi (1,020 km) to the southwest of the Cape Verde islands.[1] Only six hours later, the depression was upgraded to Tropical Storm Dolly as the storm had developed sufficient outflow and curved banding features. However, the center of circulation was still hard to find as it was embedded within a larger circulation.[2]

Overnight, Dolly continued to intensify as a large area of cold cloud tops formed around the center of the system. The center of circulation was also becoming slightly elongated, resulting in a wide span of satellite intensity estimates.[3] The circulation remained hard to locate in the early morning hours of August 30 but the overall appearance improved and the intensity of the system was increased.[4] By the late morning, the storm continued to intensify as it became better organized. Dolly reached its operational peak of 65 mph (105 km/h), though post season analysis found that the intensity was slightly weaker, reaching only 60 mph (95 km/h).[5][6] In the afternoon, the storm suddenly lost its organization and the center became partially exposed, despite a lack of factors to weaken the storm.[7] In the late night hours, dry air began to enter the west side of the system, causing Dolly to further weaken.[8]

By the morning of August 31, Dolly had weakened into a minimal tropical storm with winds of 40 mph (65 km/h) and convection surrounding the center had greatly diminished, as the storm became loosely organized.[9] In the late afternoon, Dolly rapidly began to enter an area of moderate wind shear due to an approaching trough.[10] Early on September 1, deep convection began to redevelop, though it was elongated from the northeast to southwest.[11] Throughout the day, the convection became better organized and started to wrap around the center of the storm, leading to slight intensification in the afternoon.[12] By midday on September 2, the convection fully wrapped around the center of Dolly and the storm intensified slightly once more.[13]

The intensification was short lived as by the afternoon, wind shear and dry air became entrained into the storm causing it to become disorganized. The center of Dolly became fully exposed and the storm weakened.[14] Over the next two days, Dolly fluctuated in intensity as a trough approached the system. On September 4, strong wind shear caused the convection to become dislocated from the center, leaving a disorganized storm.[15] Dolly continued to rapidly weaken and six hours later it was downgraded to a tropical depression.[16] The remnants of the depression were absorbed by the approaching trough overnight on September 4.[5]

Impact and namingEdit

The storm never approached land during its lifespan, and no damage or casualties were reported. No ships were impacted by the storm.[5]

ReferencesEdit

  1. Avila (2002-08-29). "Tropical Depression Four Discussion One". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.001.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  2. Avila (2002-08-29). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Two". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.002.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  3. Beven (2002-08-29). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Three". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.003.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  4. Lawrence (2002-08-30). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Four". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.004.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 Lixion A. Avila (2002-10-12). "Tropical Storm Dolly Tropical Cyclone Report". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/2002dolly.shtml. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  6. Avila (2002-08-30). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Five". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.005.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  7. Avila (2002-08-30). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Six". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.006.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  8. Beven (2002-08-30). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Seven". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.007.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  9. Avila (2002-08-31). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Nine". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.009.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  10. Avila (2002-08-30). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Ten". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.010.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  11. Lawrence (2002-09-01). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Twelve". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.012.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  12. Stewart (2002-09-01). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Fourteen". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.014.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  13. Stewart (2002-09-02). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Seventeen". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.017.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  14. Stewart (2002-09-02). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Eighteen". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.018.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  15. Stewart (2002-09-04). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Twenty-Four". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.024.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 
  16. Avila (2002-09-04). "Tropical Storm Dolly Discussion Twenty-Five". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2002/dis/al042002.discus.025.html. Retrieved 2008-09-07. 

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