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Hurricane Lisa (2010)

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Hurricane Lisa was a small Category 1 hurricane that stayed away from land areas. The fourteenth storm, twelveth tropical storm, seventh hurricane, and last of the Cape Verde-type season, Lisa developed from a small tropical wave near the Cape Verde Islands. It quickly intensified into Tropical Storm Lisa, and became a hurricane a couple of days later. Lisa also made an unusual eastward motion, far south by the Cape Verde Islands. Lisa never posed any threat to land areas, and dissipated out in the north Atlantic Ocean. With the dissipation of Lisa, it concluded one of the longest periods in which at least one tropical cyclone was active in the Atlantic basin, behind 2004 and tying 2005.

Meteorological historyEdit

The origins of Hurricane Lisa were traced back to a tropical wave that emerged off the west coast of Africa on September 17. Although upper-level winds were favorable for tropical cyclogenesis, dry air persisted in the vicinity of the tropical wave, and the National Hurricane Center initially gave the system only a 10% chance of development.[1] Early on September 18, the National Hurricane Center raised this percentage to 20%, identifying the area as a low pressure area. Later that morning, as the low pressure area became better organized, the percentage went up - reaching 30%. [2] Becoming further organized while heading westward, the chances of development continued to rise, and on September 19, the National Hurricane Center gave this system a "high" chance for development as it was raised to 60%.[3] Afterwards, late on the September 20, the 14th tropical depression of the 2010 Atlantic hurricane season, formed.[4]

The depression strengthened, and early the next day, becoming a tropical storm; the National Hurricane Center assigned it to the name "Lisa".[5] The storm maintained winds generally between 40-45 mph (65-75 km/h) while moving erratically eastward to toward the Cape Verde islands from September 22-23. Weakening slightly, Lisa briefly deteriorated to tropical depression status.[6] After defying the forecast path for nearly the entire duration, Lisa justified predictions and finally began to head northward on September 24.[7] Lisa remained a minimal tropical storm for most of September 24, then Lisa suddenly began to undergo rapid deepening, intensifying into a hurricane in the process.[8] Early on September 25 after becoming a hurricane, Lisa attained its peak intensity with maximum sustained winds of 85 mph (130 km/h) and a minimum barometric pressure of 982 mbar (hPa; 29.15 inHg), although satellite data reveals the possibility of a much more intense tropical cyclone,[9] but post-analysis indicates there was no underestimation of intensity.

Moving to the north, and encountering high wind shear and lower sea surface temperatures, Lisa weakened back down to a tropical storm. [10] Downgraded to a tropical storm, Lisa persisted despite very unfavorable conditions from higher wind shear and lower ocean temperatures, although it continued to weaken throughout the day. By early September 26, Lisa weakened was downgraded to a tropical depression as a result of the continuous unfavorable conditions. [11] Later on the same day that it weakened to a tropical depression, Lisa been declared dissipated as it degenerated into a remnant low.[12] The remnants of Lisa was absorbed by an extratropical storm southwest of the Azores.

Preparations and ImpactEdit

Lisa never posed an immediate threat to land, although when it turned eastward unexpectedly, the National Hurricane Center warned on the possibility of heavy rainfall on the northern Cape Verde islands. Because tropical storm force winds were not expected on Cape Verde, no tropical storm watches or warnings were issued. As Lisa was only a relatively weak tropical storm when it approached the Cape Verde islands, only light rain and winds from outer rain bands of the system were reported. Lisa quickly turned northward, and no further impact occurred on Cape Verde.

RefrencesEdit

  1. Kimberlain, Todd; Pasch, Richard (September 17, 2010). "Tropical Weather Outlook". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/gtwo/atl/201009171212/index.php?basin=atl&current_issuance=201009171212. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  2. Beven, Jack; Kimberlain, Todd (September 18, 2010). "Tropical Weather Outlook". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/gtwo/atl/201009181154/index.php?basin=atl&current_issuance=201009181154. Retrieved October 15, 2010. 
  3. Brennan, Michael (September 19, 2010). "Tropical Weather Outlook". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/gtwo/atl/201009190546/index.php?basin=atl&current_issuance=201009190546. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  4. Cangialosi, David (September 20, 2010). "Tropical Depression Fourteen Advisory Number 1". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.001.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  5. Roberts, Ben; Beven, Jack (September 21, 2010). "Tropical Storm Lisa Advisory Number 2". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.002.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  6. Kimberlain, Todd (September 23, 2010). "Tropical Depression Lisa Advisory Number 1". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.010.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  7. Stewart, Stacy (September 24, 2010). "Tropical Storm Lisa Advisory Number 15". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.015.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  8. Blake, Eric (September 24, 2010). "Hurricane Lisa Special Advisory Number 17". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.017.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  9. Blake, Eric (September 25, 2010). "Hurricane Lisa Advisory Number 18". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.018.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  10. Stewart, Stacy (September 25, 2010). "Tropical Storm Lisa Advisory Number 20". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.020.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  11. Brown, Daniel (September 26, 2010). "Tropical Depression Lisa Advisory Number 23". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.023.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 
  12. Cangialosi, David; Roberts, Ben (September 26, 2010). "Tropical Depression Lisa Advisory Number 25". National Hurricane Center. http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2010/al14/al142010.public.025.shtml?. Retrieved October 17, 2010. 

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